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what jefferson was warning about. of course the u.s. and the u.k. governments are furious. not that we're exposing things that harm national security, because we haven't, that we're exposing things that harm their
. kerry is now in london for talks with the u.k. government falling an e.u. foreign minister's statement insisting there was, quote, strong evidence the assad regime was behind the alleged use of chemical weapons. john kerry is due to hold a press conference with u.k. foreign secretary william haig any minute now. we, of course, will bring you that live on this show. we have our middle east correspondent outside the ministry of defense where kerry will be speaking. she joins us on the phone. hadley, what is kerry trying to achieve here? we know that the house of commons voted against a u.k. involvement. >> reporter: good morning, carol. we're at the foreign office. we'll hear from foreign minister william hague. despite the support from pal lamt, mr. hague said it would be an alarming moment if action is not taken. we've seen secretary kerry gaining support over the last 48 hours. he says now that countries who support action in syria are in the double digits. first in france we saw the support, and then members of the arab league. this is the possibility of a u.n. security council resol
against hundreds of his own people are not going to happen again. and our special relationship with the uk is not just about syria, it's not just about a response to this humanitarian crisis, it's also about the future and climate change and economic prosperity for all of our people. we are not only -- we are both committed to try to move forward on a trade relationship, to grow jobs for our people. and we are not only each other's largest investors in each of our countries, one to the other, but the fact is that everyday almost 1 million people go to work in america for british companies that are in the united states just as more than 1 million people go to work here in great britain for american companies that are here. so we are enormously tied together obviously. and we are committed to making both the u.s., uk and the u.s.-eu stronger drivers of prosperity. last month the united states held the first round of the negotiations for the trans atlantic trade partnership and we will continue to work closely together because we both believe that working with the uk and the rest of the eu to
. meanwhile in the u.k. -- >> allegations that a british company was granted a license to explore potential nerve gas agents to syria has left the government facing tough questions as to how that was allowed to happen. >> 1,000 days in confinement. house arrest. time spent in a london prison, and now limbo in the ecuadorian embassy. the battle for transparency. and radiation at japan's fukushima plant has spiked to lethal levels, reportedly enough to kill in just four hours of exposure. >> live from our studios here in moscow, where it's just turned 1:00 a.m. on a tuesday morning, this is "r.t." german intelligence has reportedly laid the blame on the attack in syria on the assad government. the news website has just broken the story, so let's get all the details now from r.t.'s pete oliver in berlin. peter, what does this german intelligence report actually tell us? tell us more about it. >> what we've seen reported is that the head of the german security services held a meeting with top brass. the main political move is to talk about what intelligence germany had regarding chemical attack
's good news for the stock market. this is a huge, huge cash windfall that will come into the u.k. markets. that might be the home of a lt t of this investment. we have ipos, stake sales, rights issues. this money coming back to investors could be quite important. >> might help sterling out a little bit as well. we'll watch that. plenty more to come from helia. >>> to the middle east. the syrian government has caused the u.s. decision to wait, a retreat. they called it historic. in a number of tv appearances yesterday, john kerry hammered home the message that there was no doubt that chemical weapons had been used. >> use of chemical weapons is unacceptable and we cannot, cannot stand by and allow that to happen and create an impunity for its use. that would be the end of the chemical weapons and that's why the president's made the decision. why go to congress? because the united states of america is stronger when the congress of the united states representing the people and the president of the united states are acting together. >> the u.s. lawmakers appear to remain divided on the use of
are concerned, we'll be keeping our eyes on the uk. we've got the final gdp out in 25 minutes or so. the second revision did pick up from 0.6 to 0.7%. we've got final print of gdp out of the u.s. today. yields, 2763%. still below where we move post the fed 2.67% yield. italian yields slightly higher at the moment. take a look at the currency markets, haven't done a lot over this week. dollar/yen still just below 99 and sterling still maintaining that 1.60 level. we haven't improved or moved much away from the levels we hit this time last week. >> let's get a check on markets in asia. li sixuan standing by in singapore. sixuan, over to you. >> thank you, deidre. despite u.s. fiscal worries, the nikkei 225 reverse warning will send higher by 1.2% on hopes of imminent corporate tax cuts. an xwokt vehicle related tax cuts supported automakers. but china markets saw profit taking ahead of the week long holiday this week. the shanghai deposit ending down almost 2%. and the big loser on the hong kong bores was global supply chain manager leonfong. its major customer, walmart, is cutting orders. but so
in taiwan but in the u.k.. the museum i worked for is the victory and museum in london, which is an art museum, and one of the best museums in the world. after 70 years -- after 17 years in london, i came back to taiwan and joined the university. my experience includes arts marketing, cultural activities, also innovation and cultural institutions. >> certainly sounds very impressive area -- very impressive. local activities can play a big heart in promoting a particular city. how is that the case. what's the trend on the global level? what is the trend local festivities can help raise a country or city's international image? >> that's a very good question. in theory, it's not only a local phenomenon, i think it's a global phenomenon. other countries in the world hold a lot of festivals every year. for example, in france, courting to a survey, there are more than 800 festivals in france every year. 60% of them began after 1980s from which you can see it is a global phenomenon. in taiwan, there are more than 450 festivals taking place on this small island. we can say every day we have fes
was out of their control. there came a point where they directly threatened legal action. in the u.k., the government can stop publication. i do not know that that is possible in the u.s. it wasame a point where obvious we had only two options. return the material or destroy it. it did not matter much to me because the material was already in america, i have already shared some of it with "the new so it would not make a difference in the reporting, but i did not want to get caught up in a legal action. happened,izarre thing most bizarre in my journalistic career. two technical people from the government telecommunications headquarters, the equivalent of the nsa, came into the guardian, and supervised the destruction of our laptops. >> you said you would not give it to them but would destroy it on your own? said we would not give it to them, but there was always the threat hanging in the background of criminal action against "the guardian." i do not know what these discs would have told them, and i did not want to give them evidence that could be used against " the guardian. difficult
is variable at best. we're urging the u.k. government the time has come to provide more than humanitarian financial assistance in the region. to its credit the u.k. government is providing substance humanitariasubsubstann package. but ideally resettlement program of the scale of the once in germany at present. >> are you communicating those ideas to the different european governments, and if so, how are they responding? >> we're urging our government in the u.k. together with amnesty international and the british red cross. we've urging our government to work with the european union states to device and develop a common program. but we would also like to see the u.k. government acting unilaterally and moving ahead now. >> it must be quite frightening really for syrian refugees to land somewhere where they don't speak the language, they're far from home. what kind of organizations like yours do to try to ease them into their new homes? >> well, organizations such as the refugee council of the u.k. do a lot of work with newly arrived asylum speakers in the u.k. to make sure that they're loo
and then voted down military action for the u.k. in syria. he says that he was surprised but he was pleased. and it shows that there are rational minds at play in the government and that that debate needs to happen. he also appealed to president obama not just as a president but as noble laureate, winner of the noble peace prize. >> let's not forget that barack obama is a noble obama peace prize lariat. the united states has started several conflicts in various parts of the world. but did that solve any problems? afghanistan, iraq, libya, there's no democracy there now which is what the u.s. claimed it tried to bring. there's no civil peace or balance. all of these have to be taken into account before making the decision to stop bombing syria which will lead to civilian casualties. >> so russia continuing to stand in their position that the world needs to wait for the u.n. investigation to take place. the world needs to act globalably. it looks like now that president obama will be sending it back to congress. and so we will wait to see if that spirited debate that happened in the u.k. parl
using these things. >> bryan, thanks for that. we got to go. i have some uk data. go to cnbc.com to find out the other contenders in smart watch wars as well. british services sector growth, new order, huge, actually. 60.2 in july. sorry. 60.5 in july. 60.5 in august. 60.2 in july. highest since december 2006. sterling up at the best levels of the day, 155.75. composite pmi above 60 for the first time. and so russian new business last month driving the fastest growth in britain services sector for more than six years. we're looking for it to slow slightly down to 59. banks to restaurants, the fastest pace since may 1997. that's when tony blair became prime minister. the sector recovery, evidence, has some legs essentially. this is the highest level since the composite series began as well in 1998. so three more activity surveys this week, which outstripped expectations. the oecd raised its forecast for the british economy. what do you think? this looks real. this feels and looks real. >> each additional data point that comes out makes it look more and more robust. the question is twofold
the fact that we had triple digit gains for the dow jones industrial average. up 0.2% for the german and uk markets. the cac 40 is flat. the ftse mib is fairly flat, as well. it's still expecting improvement in the second half of the year. stocks up nearly 5%. we have ricardo group at 1.85%. so i think it's encouraging growth in both autos and basket size, as well. next, up 0.3%, 8.2 % rise for next. and finally, home retail group up around 4% e at the moment, confirming its full year profit guidance after like-for-like sales increased 2.7% over the last year with those comparable sales at its home based stores jumped around about 11%. a couple of other stocks, as well, richemont down 2.72% after luxury groups reporting a 9% sales growth for the first five months of the year. the group blaming weaker than expected demand from china. let's get a little bit more. karen is looking at this stock for us. >> analysts were expecting a slowdown partly because of that crackdown on corruption. having said that, the slowdown was more pronounced than many analysts were participating. sales in asia over
unilaterally. that's the last thing they want to be seen especially after they ruled out any u.k. involvement. >>> all right, in cairo. >>> the british prime minister david cameron faced a defeat in parliament just a few days ago. that happened when the majority voted against military strikes in syria. it shows cam ran doesn't have strong support among the public either. 60% of those questioned said they were against british troops given the level of evidence given the proof of chemical weapons by ashad's regime. only 21% said they thought david cameron acted because he generally believed in that using chemical weapons syria crossed the red line and acted badly. well in all 71% of voters said they felt that resent military action to libya, afghanistan and iraq made it less likely to gather any other military interventions abroad. joins us live from london for more on this. lawrence, there's shock images coming ot of syria following those alleged chemical weapons attack. what's the story in the u.k. that they don't want anything done about this. >> reporter: one thing is that's strikeing the a
. >> overseas - secretary of state john kerry is said to hold a joint press conference with uk foreign secretary william hague. he's reiterated his support for washington's stance despite a lack of military support from the uk. it follows meetings with arab leaders. >> america's top diplomat came to paris to strengthen french support for a military strike on syria. he came to seek help from members of the arab league. >> there is no military solution. what the united states is seeking, together with others - not alone but with others - an increasing number - what we are seeking is to enforce the standard with respect to the use of chemical weapons. we are not seeking to become engaged in or party to or take over syria's civil war. >> the arab league has unanimously condemned the syrian leadership for its apparent use of chemical weapons. qatar is a handful of arab nations supporting international military intervention in syria. when pressed qatar failed to answer what help it was prepared to give. >> translation: when it comes to syria and what qatar can do, we are examining the trends of the
in around about 20 minutes time in the uk. we got a nudge down in july from june, as well. the annual rate at the moment, currently running about 2.8% in july. meanwhile, the big thing is what happened with the fed. and ahead of that, the dollar, well, today it's been edging lower. seen in a tight range before. euro/dollar, 1.3347. we've been unable to maintain the break above 100 on the dollar/yen. aussie dollar is a little weaker. sterling/dollar is still above 1.59. investors wait to see what will bernanke do? and if he does as expected with a moderate taping of the bond budget program, how will the markets react? speaking to "squawk box" earlier, the head strategist at commerzbank said investors have given the dollar the benefit of the doubt and explained why he believes there was a possibility the fed may modify it's guidance. >> we've seen ten-year treasuries modify significantly. so that move is done and perfectly priced in. the question, however, is the fed will obviously be reasonably happy about that. but what they're not going to be so happy about is what's happening at the shor
correspondent joins us from london. you were there today. the u.k. and u.s. have long had a special relationship as they call it. last week, the british parliament voted against military intervention. what else was revoked at the conference today? >> that was one of the key messages from the u.s. secretary of state. john kerry was very clear and so was his british counterpart. the u.s. and u.k. are closely aligned on syria. amongst the key messages that were not just for the british public before the world and very much for america as john kerry prepares to fly back to washington to make the case for what he said was not work. he said we are not going to war. who do not want to hurt any civilians. one of the key messages was that there was strong evidence against the assad regime where the rockets were want, where they landed. the fact the assad regime had tried to cover up the evidence. john kerry saying this was a humanitarian catastrophe of global proportions. that in action was riskier than action. this was echoed by the british foreign secretary. they are very close. as john kerry pointed o
. the president of the national coalition and i discussed ways that the u.k. could provide further none lethal support to the opposition to help save lives, alleviating their pain and suffering, providing services in areas no longer under the regime control and prepare for geneva too. this support is done because of the appalling crimes being submitted in syria. the human rights council independent international inquiry issued a report yesterday describing crimes against humanity and war crimes, being committed by the regime and forces, including indiscriminate shelling, seizure, massacre, murder, torture, rape and sexual violence and forced does appearances, execution and pillage and violations committed by extremist anti regime armed groups which we also condemn. on top of this we're mounting mass murder by the regime's use of chemical weapons. >> we have made it clear we respect the views of the house. the u.n. team is expected to report on its investigation into the 21st of august attack early next week. we await their findings, there should be no doubt in this house that all the evidence
't think so. the majority of work in the u.k. is corporate, and america -- it was built on amazing corporate buildings in new york and chicago. you have a great thing here as well. that image is different. you are relying on the know-how of the client and the developer. and this is a different dynamic. >> games companies were accused of trying to persuade children to buy extras as they play and drive up the bills. the companies have been told to stop preying on the bowman ability of children. they know how easily the bills can rise. >> young students like yourself learn the way of magic. >> these are free to download and free to play. but are among the highest grossingames in the lucrative world of online gaming. something about that does not compute. how do they make money if they are free? >> that is the shop where we were. >> as your kid starts to play they seem to do what they say. your children, entertained and distracted at zero cost. it, these games will pinch your child with options that may cost you some very on virtual money. -- unvirtual money. >> i cannot go there becau
.6%. vodafone says that 75% of the german cable company shareholders have agreed to the uk firm's 7.7 billion euro takeover. the uk telecom school will publish details on monday on exactly how many shares have been tendered. vodafone is buying germany's largest cable division in order to offer more phones and services. >>> in the bond space, we are not seeing any major moves ahead of the fomc meeting next week. the ten-year treasury yield is sitting at 9.2%. a dip below that 9.2s level earlier this week. a little bit of caution in that is those markets, as well been sitting below those two-year highs at 2798%. but getting closer to the 3% level again. the ten-year italian yield, this is the most interesting one this week. the yield shot above that at the ten-year spanish taper. this is obviously on the back of the political tensions that we've been seeing in italy this week. and is we'll talk much more about that with a guest in about 20 minutes' time. meanwhile, the dollar is climbing against the yen and the korean won on a report that the president obama is said to nominate larry summers as
and rand rallied back strongly. >> another bit of data out on of the uk, retail sales, it's the first bit of data for a while that's weaker than expected. surprisingly weak in august as consumers reigned in spending. retail sales volume down 0.9% on the on month. this is wrong for economists who expected it to rise 0.4%. the annual rate of growth slowed from 2.1% from july's 2 1/2 year high of 3%. they say the july figure was boosted by a heat wave which lifted sales of barbecue food and outdoor items. it's providing additional reasons to splash out. food sales down 2.7% on the month of awl august. which fully reversed july's gains. of course, we've had rising house prices, record low mortgage rates and an economic recovery given consumer spending something of a boost, although retailers always putting something of a cautious note on that. sterling/dollar, dipping down to the session low on the back of that. as i said, it's the first sort of worse than expected economic dey data we've had out of the uk for quite some time. we did get up to 1.6184 post the fed dipping down now to 1.6086. t
to attract investment. these efforts could be undermined by further delays to the application by able u.k.. could i urge the prime minister to respond to requests from the leader of the council on -- to earlyene to ensure an determination before the december deadline? >> i have spoken to my honorable friend and his colleagues on a number of occasions about this very important investment. we all want to see them become a real magnet for investment. i am very happy to look at the issue that he has raised with me before. i am very happy to look at the issue of the planning commission with the response of the council. >> ellen goodman. >> thank you, mr. speaker. the parents of the one million unemployed young people will think the prime minister is totally out of touch. this year, the number of young people with jobs has dropped by 77,000. the governments you contract has reached fewer than 1/10 of the people it was supposed to help. doesn't the prime minister understand that not everybody likes their first job -- , she the honorable lady should welcome the fact that the number of young peopl
. everyone seems to be at the same place. they agree on chemical weapons for use. whether you're in the uk, america, in europe, no one seemed to have the political will to do anything about it. >> hadley, for now, thank you. >>> on the heat map, pretty even stevens this morning, as you can see. so about five to four, really, advancers outpacing decliners at the moment. the ftse 100 yesterday was up over 50 points. we tried to start firmer this morning. at the moment, just down nine. this is despite, of course, the u.s. having its second day of triple gains on the dow. xetra dax is up 0.25%, cac 40 down 0.25%. we're waiting to see what the senate committee does as far as mr. berlusconi is concerned. apple stock in frankfurt down 3.75%. arm is doing fairly well. app apple is not so hot, as you can see. the country is failing to fire the imagination with its so-called cheaper phone. meanwhile, nokia, as you can see here, up 2.5%. burnsburg listing the country to a buy claiming it's well placed for a looming battle in the telecom space. keep your eyes on the bond rates, as well. treasury yield
it says about the u.s.'s ability to build a coalition without the u.k. right now, the only major ally pledging military support is france. >> paul, thank you very much. >> while the president's made it clear the u.s. should take military action against syria, many americans seem to disagree. a recent nbc poll asked whether the at the should launch and attack on syria. 42% of those polled said yes. 50% said no. however, more americans say they support military action when specifically told that the attacks would not involve boots on the ground or the use of navy jets. 50% support that type of attack, 44% oppose it. eight in 10 americans agree with the president, 16% saying congressional approval is not needed. internationally, the obama administration is losing allies for any possible military action. last week, great britain said they would not participate and now germany also opting out. the chancellor and opponent in the upcoming election vowed they would not act with the u.n. security council signing off, leaving the u.s. to seek support from turkey and france for intervention. we
's questions will not be shown tonight. topics range from foreign policy to domestic issues in the u.k.. >> please welcome the leader of the labour party, ed miliband.♪ ♪ [applause] >> i want to start by thanking somebody from the bottom of my heart. a round of applause for justine, ladies and gentlemen. [applause] not my mum, but a woman called ella phillips. she rode past me on her bike. she fell off. i helped her off, and she called me something i had never been called before. she said i was an action hero. why are you laughing? she said i was an action hero who mysteriously appeared out of nowhere. she said ed was not geeky at all. she said even the way he appeared was suave. i don't know why you find this so funny. he was dressed casually but had style. sounds like me, doesn't it? i was pretty pleased with this, as you can tell, until something dawned on me. ella said, i was seeing things because i was in quite a daze. you are not kidding, but let me say, if you are watching today, thank you. you have made my year. [applause] i want to start today with the simplest of thou
. in the eurozone will green chutes fade into autumn leaves. in the u.k. is the strength of the services data that we're seeing and the manufacturing data going to actually translate into decent hard data and in the u.s. is there any impact on the other hand of people anticipating this shutdown and saying that sends a very bad signal for america? >> well, we'll talk it out certainly throughout the show. staying with us, mark oswald, strategist at monument securities. >>> give us your opinion. there should be lots of them this week. take part in our online poll this week. we're asking you how to trade the s&p 500 as a u.s. shutdown looms. head to trader poll.cnbc.com and cast your vote. straightaway you will begin to see the trend. you can have your say in twitter, use #traderpoll and you can tweet ross or i. >> you can. don't miss out on that. got some data out of italy. producer points up 2% month on month. the year end rate falling .2%. the biggest decline in almost four years. the annual decline the biggest since 2009. plenty more to come on today's show. >> we're just full of good news to
and questions being raised as to how the uk government could be so careless. >> yes, that is the central allegation being levelled at them. it was granted in january last year, well after clearly the civil war had begun. inside syria and it all comes down to these two chemicals and what the usage was. the two chemicals concerned were potassium fluoride and the company wanted to export the things told the department for business here the chemicals were to be used in the manufacture and construction of metal window frames and shower enclosures but as many chemical experts have pointed out the chemicals are crucial for the manufacturer of chemical nerve agents and it led to all the allegations now that the government is at worst accused of hiprocacy because they are accused of dreadful war crimes and getting an export license to a company to expert the things which could have been used in the manufacture of the very same things and we cannot prove it's true that the chemicals were never actually sent but the point is raised again if you go before the iraq war when the weapons inspectors wer
talking about trying to assemble a coalition of the willing. but the u.k. parliament says it won't take part, germany and canada have ruled themselves out, and we still don't know the position of the united states. it's hard to see right now who the other partners in a military intervention could be. >> and speaking in buts sells the secretary general of nato ruled out involvement of the alliance. >> if a response to what has happened in syria were to be a military operation, i would in visits a very short, targeted operation. >> the french parliament will debate. but there will be no vote on military action. that decision lies with the president alone. and right now, he looks like a lead who is paralyzed. jackie roland, al jazeera, paris. >> the senate foreign relations committee will meet today as the administration continues its full on press for con depressional approval. joining us to assess congress' reaction to the vote on syria is stephen zunya. professor, thank you for joining us this morning. >> thank you. >> it's a pleasure to have you, but professor, the secretary of state j
is an incase re in booking severe weather is proving disastrous for dvers in the uk. we have that i world weather. >> yes, we had a long frontal system that is pulling in and swinging by and creating severe weather that includes foggy conditions as well. take a look at this video from the uk. a multiple car piled up occurred on a motor way in the english county of kent on early thursday morning. over 100 vehicles were involved in the crash. 60 people injured with eight people in serious conditions. witnesses reported low visibility due to a fog at the time of the accident. the passing cold front will be now aiming towards western half of this continent so it will be quite unstable across much of the west and that includes wet and cooler weather the way some gusty conditions as well as thunderstorms from spain all the way up to northwestern germany continuing for your friday. looking nice and fine out here, but quite unstable in the southern areas especially in italy and sicily with thunderstorms in store for you for the most of the day. dipping down is this jet stream to the south. that's
. mai, people in the uk are dealing with severe weather. what's the latest there? >> good morning, catherine. you're right, yes. we had a long frontal system that's pulling in and swinging by across the british isles. it is creating some severe weather and that includes foggy conditions as well. take a look at this video coming out from the uk. a multiple car pile-up occurred on a motorway in the english county of kent on early thursday morning. over 100 vehicles were involved in this crash. at least 60 people have been reportedly injured with 8 people in serious conditions. witnesses reported low visibility due to fog at the time of the accident. the passing cold front will be now aiming towards the western half of this continent. so it's going to be quite unstable across much of the west and that includes wet and cooler weather with some gusty conditions as well as thunderstorms stretching from spain all the way up towards northwestern germany. and that's going to be continuing for your friday. looking pretty nice and fine out here, but it's quite unstable in the southern areas,
. >> france is now the u.s.'s only major ally after the u.k. parliament ruled out taking part of the attack. the french leadership denies the company is diplomatically isolated. >> i believe that while at first sight we seem ice laterred in the beginning we now have the support of a wide community and we hope a coalition of goodwill is being formed. >> so far most countries have stopped short of supporting military action against syria. preferring the wait for a u.n. chemical weapons report before ordering a strike. france is prepared to order for the u.n. inspectors report, goes in some way that the country is being dragged into a conflict by the united states. most of the french is against a strike in syria but if french president hollande decides to go ahead, it may hurry him politically in his country. eu talk of military intervention. >> in the face of the cynical use of chemical weapons the international community cannot remain idle. >> for the obama administration the challenge is more than international. president obama has to sell his case for war to fellow politicians and the amer
half of americans are against any strikes on syria. that figures even higher in france and the u.k. it is showing 60 and 80% against military action. similar sentiments shared in germany and italy. incidentally as well, a share against intervention in syria's neighbor turkey is even higher. syria's president ausada says that he had nothing to do with any chemical weapons attack. there is no evidence linking him to it. in the u.s., that claim is backed up in a letter to president obama written by former military analysts. i was told about the mood on capitol hill and why he thinks the president may be softening his stance. >> last friday, kerry went before the cameras and said we got to do this and here is the, not intelligence, mind you, but the government assessment meaning the white house had a chance to massage it and edit it. it didn't hold up to scrutiny. apparently the military got to the president. i see some evidence of this. the next thing we know, the president has changed his mind on saturday afternoon and the only thing that really intervened was the chairman of the joi
there are western diplomats particularly from the u.k. and france that would have liked a slightly differently deal, a security council resolution with the use of force built in. meaning that if there was a breach by assad it would automatically trigger the use of force. it would be legal to start air strikes in syria. now that is not in the current deal. in the current deal, if there is a violation, if there's a breach then they have to come back to the security council to debate it. so can i give you a scenario? what if a few months down the line, a few days or weeks down the line there's a breach, the western governments say there's a breach, and they say no no, that is a technical matter. the u.s. and the u.k. and france will want to pursue military action and russia will again veto it. >> let's take this a step further james. is that not to say there's not a scenario where the u.s. might still take their own military action still? >> absolutely, absolutely. the u.s. has made it clear, obama has made it clear that they are prepared to take their own unilateral action. but they are in a process,
penalty in the u.k., the second- largest ever in modern banking history here -- 137 million pound penalty in the u.k. >> the thanks chairman, jamie dimon, says they have accepted responsibility and acknowledge their mistakes from the start -- the bank's chairman. some says the episode shows the culture in the bank has not changed nearly enough. >> people who work for the bank want to make money for the bank because it gets them a bigger bonus and makes them look good, but what they have not heard is that the people at the top of these banks are trying to stop significant risk aching, and they should not be doing this sort of thing. this shows a failure in communication and a failure in culture amongst these banks. >> what regulators still jpmorgan, one of the traders cooperating has not been charged with wrongdoing. two others face criminal charges because of their role allegedly trying to hide mounting losses. big gonefine for a wrong. in other news, a commission of inquiry into the deaths of 34 miners in south africa has now accused the police of lying. the commission said that police h
in the system. one of those voices is a former u.k. diplomat who now advises the syrian opposition. >> one of the odds things that i experienced with the one group of people you could guarantee would not be consulted on what was being discussed in the security council were the people most effected. so whether it's it's sudanese r syrians, their representatives would never get a chance to have a say on what they thought the world should do. >> world leaders are all arriving in new york. there will again be much talk of reform of the u.n. system, but there is very little chance of progress on what so many say are much needed changes. >> and joining us now from the u.n. is john terra. what can you tell us about this weekend, the most pressing issue facing those there? >> most pressing issue, the chemical weapons crisis. they'll be looking for an resolution on that issue. the new star of the show, iranian president hassan rouhani, and then the israelis and palestinians getting into deeper peace negotiations, and libya and pakistan getting over the old sore of kashmir. we'll see. >> so much of
, but more with the u.s. in the u.k. because, as you know, the victims and the perpetrators came from kenya, the u.k. and the united states. >> both british and american citizens were among the perpetrators? >> yes. from the information that we have, two or three americans, and i think so far i have heard of one brit. >> the brit was a british-born woman. woman. i think she's done this many times before. >> and the americans? >> from the information we have, are young men, about - between maybe 18 and 19. >> of somali orange jip. >> of somali or arab, that lived in the u.s., in minnise oata is one -- minnesota, i think, is one place. that underlines the global nature of the war we are fighting. >> a small grouch of demonstrators held a protest at the university of ohio where the president of the somalia lives. >> chant chant >> mr mohammed said he met with kenya's president to send his condolences. he called al-shabab a threat to the world. >> police in chicago charged two men in connection with a shooting that injured 13 people. the shooting broke out last thursday at a basketball court in
get away with stuff. >> the assistant editor, thanks. human rights workers traveling through the u.k. have been put on notice. on monday night a year many human rights activist was detained at gatwick airport -- a yemeni human rights activist was detained at gatwick airport. police found neither man had connection with terrorism, and they were both released, but on monday he was asked a series of questions about his charity work, in particular his advocacy for victims of drone strikes in yemen. he question, what if your organization did something bad for your government? what if you are here because of the bad things done to your government? relations are important. i want to know they are not disrupting. we are referring to a charity organization. the strategic director warned, this is part of a worsening campaign of intimidation of human rights workers going on at the border. if there were any doubt the u.k. were abusing powers to silence critics, this ends it. in may of this year he testified in front of congress for the drone war program. a spokesman confirmed the incident at the
year. the u.k. recovery is proving to be better than expected. the british economy grew 0.7% in the second quarter. but official government figures suggest that the recovery still remains fragile. >> the view across britain's premier financial district suggests a building boom, with a patchwork of construction sites around the historic city of london. construction was hit hard during the economic crisis. the news should act as a mirror to the wider british economy. and construction grew by 1.9% from april to june, according to the u.k. office for national statistics, a figure reflected in positive returns from one of britain's biggest house builders. >> we have seen an increase of 25% over the past five months. we certainly seem to have turned a corner in the last few months. very positive, i think, about the next few years ahead of us. >> construction is a labor- intensive industry. if they are doing well here, you could have a trickle-down effect two general levels of unemployment. it is being watched closely not just by the british government, but also by the bank of en
.s. prepares for a major change in health care the u.k. is facing the biggest remodelling of the health system since the birth of the nhs. the nation is implementing the health and service care act. intended to have oversight, streamlined coverage and allowing private outsourcing. >> from 5 july... . >> since its creation in 1946. the nhs is the largest single payer health server. every british system had access to the same medical care, regardless of the individual cost. there has been difficulties and scandals along the way. one of the biggest revealed in a 2009 investigation, uncovered hundreds of patients in two hospitals dying through negligence and poor management. critics say the scandal exposed the nhs as a bloated bure okay rahsy caring -- bure okay rahsy, caring little for the patients and more for protecting jobs. >> julie lost her mother and started to cure the nhs. she supports the idea of a national health care system, but warns americans of creating a bureaucracy so large in it is abused or mistreated. >> one thing you have to watch out for is accountability. that is lacking in
this report from london. >> as the u.s. prepares for a major change in haelth care the u.k. is facing the biggest remodelling of their health system since the birth of the nhs. the nation is busy implementing the 2012 health and service care act intended to create more oversight, streamline coverage and controversially allowing for private outsourcing. >> since its creation in 1940. the nhs is the world's largest single payer health service. every british citizen had access to the same care regardless of the individual cost. there has been difficulties and scandals along the way. one of the biggest revealed in a 2009 investigation uncovered hundreds of patients in two hospitals who died through negligence and poor management. critics say the scandal exposed the nhs as a bloated bureaucracy that cared little for the parnts and more about -- patients and more about bnts and jobs. >> julie bailey lost her mother and started to cure the nhs. she warns americans about creating a bureaucracy so large that abuses are undiagnosed or untreated. >> one thing they need to watch out for in americ
chase. 100 37 million pound penalty in the u.k., the second- largest ever in modern banking history here -- 137 million pound penalty in the u.k. >> the thanks chairman, jamie dimon, says they have accepted responsibility and acknowledge their mistakes from the start -- the bank's chairman. some says the episode shows the culture in the bank has not changed nearly enough. >> people who work for the bank want to make money for the bank because it gets them a bigger bonus and makes them look good, but what they have not heard is that the people at the top of thesbanks are trying to stop significant risk aching, and they should not be doing this sort of thing. this shows a failure in communication and a failure in culture amongst these banks. >> what regulators still jpmorgan, one of the traders cooperating has not been charged with wrongdoing. two others face criminal charges because of their role allegedly trying to hide mounting losses. big gonefine for a wrong. in other news, a commission of inquiry into the deaths of 34 miners in south africa has now accused the police of lying. the co
in the u.k. has not been able to confirm or deny the involvement of a british woman in the siege. a six thesaid that british national was killed. this man's wife and honor are among the bridge victims -- wife and under are among the british victims. he had waited outside for days before hearing the news. his relatives in the u.k. are distraught. >> very hard to take it. >> arial pictures filmed on monday highlight the scale of the fire inside westgate, which raged for hours. it is thought that mattresses and soft furnishings were set alight by the gun man. it is hard to imagine what remaining hostages and their families must be going through. the city morgue has been told to prepare for many bodies. emily buchanan, bbc news. well, very harrowing stories emerging of the people who survived and the relatives who didn't. and what went on in that dreadful faculty where people went about their business doing the shopping and suddenly the vience was visited upon them. let's hear from a man who was in the center. he was shot, but survived. >> we were at the coffee house on the top floor, where
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